Pacific Sociological Association Honors UC Santa Cruz Sociology Alumnus, Paul Almeida

April 01, 2015

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Paul Almeida, who earned his BA in Sociology from UCSC in 1991, was awarded the Distinguished Scholarship Award by the Pacific Sociological Association (PSA) for his book, Mobilizing Democracy: Globalization and Citizen Protest (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014).

Paul Almeida, who earned his BA in Sociology (College 8) from UCSC in 1991, was recently awarded the 2015 Distinguished Scholarship Award by the PSA for his book, Mobilizing Democracy: Globalization and Citizen Protest (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014).

“If all politics is local, then how do the politics of globalization manifest themselves?” Almeida asks in his latest book that examines how citizens mobilize against neoliberal policies in the global South.

In Mobilizing Democracy: Globalization and Citizen Protest, Almeida explores the dynamics of social and political movements from the ground up. Focusing on the microlevel, Almeida looks at the protagonists challenging the status quo. From labor unions to students, teachers, community groups, NGOs, women’s organizations and oppositional political parties, Almeida examines how protests are shaped.

As a sociology student at UC Santa Cruz, Almeida studied with Professors Andrew Szasz, James O'Connor, William Domhoff and Walter Goldfrank. Almeida shares how the department’s emphasis on political economy and political sociology led him to focus his research on political change.

“My experience as an undergraduate sociology major exposed me to global processes  of economic and social change,” Almeida adds.  He also volunteered at the Monseñor Oscar Arnulfo Romero Central American Refugee Committee where his relationship with Central America materialized. He then went onto graduate school at UC Riverside where he was mentored by professor Linda Stearns.

Almeida is now an associate professor at UC Merced where he researches social movement dynamics in authoritarian regimes and collective action during political and economic transitions.

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